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AO/LOs

Curriculum strands

Specialist strands

AOs/LOs by level

Technological practice (TP)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3

Technological knowledge (TK)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3

Nature of technology (NT)

6-1 | 6-2

7-1 | 7-2

8-1 | 8-2

Design in technology (DET)

6-1 | 6-2

7-1 | 7-2

8-1/2

Manufacturing (MFG)

6-1 | 6-2

7-1 | 7-2

8-1/2

Technical areas (TCA)

8-1 

Construction and mechanical technologies (CMT)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3 | 6-4

6-5 | 6-6 | 6-7

7-1 |  7-2 |  7-3 |  7-4

7-5 |  7-6 |  7-7

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3 | 8-4

8-5 | 8-6 | 8-7

Design and visual communication (DVC)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3

Digital technologies (DTG)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3 | 6-4

6-5 | 6-6 | 6-7 | 6-8

6-9 | 6-10 | 6-11 | 6-12

7-1 |  7-2 |  7-3 |  7-4

7-5 |  7-6 |  7-7 |  7-8

7-9 |  7-10 |  7-11 |  7-12

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3 | 8-4

8-5 |  8-6/7 | 8-8 | 8-9

8-10 |  8-11 | 8-12

Processing technologies (PRT)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1/2 | 8-3


Implement a process PRT 8-1/2

Implement a process focuses on undertaking appropriate procedures to process a specified product. Products may include but are not limited to: fermented or non-fermented foods and beverages, biologically active products, household chemicals, toiletries, cosmetics, paper, resin or fibreglass products.

Learning objective: PRT 8-1/2

Students will:

  • implement complex procedures to make a processed product.

Indicators

  • Analyses and justifies the procedures used to process a specified product.
  • Explains how processing operations can be controlled by test feedback.
  • Evaluates the appropriateness of safety, risk management, and quality assurance plans.
  • Makes informed decisions based on knowledge of techniques, operations and testing feedback.
  • Modifies processing operations based on feedback from testing.
  • Calculates yield and relevant financial costs.
  • Develops suitable safety, risk management, and assurance plans.

Progression

Initially students learn to follow appropriate processing operations and undertake testing to make a product that meets specifications. Students at level 8 progress to complex processing operations that require analysis, modification, testing, and calculation of relevant factors such as cost and yield.

Teacher guidance

To support students to implement complex procedures to make a processed product, at level 8, teachers could:

  • support students in determining the techniques that have been involved in specific processing of materials
  • discuss the difference between process control in the classroom and in industry for a specified product
  • demonstrate complex processing operations such as:  distilling, cryogenic freezing, and batch transfer
  • support students in the implementation of complex processing operations
  • provide or negotiate with students the selection of a specified product
  • support students in the development of safety plans, risk management plans, and quality assurance plans.

Contexts for teaching and learning

Choosing the context for the learning and assessment

While the assessment resource depicts a food product the following would hold true for other products that may be developed by the students.

Literacy considerations

Students will need to develop the skills such as:

  • use correct conventions in flow charting a process, including feedback loops abnd parallel processes
  • communicate ideas - graphically and in an annotated format
  • undertake research and use this to inform their work
  • sift sort and synthesise information
  • ability to understand TQM and quality control processes (this will support students in the implementation of manufacturing process AS3.13) and health and safety processes related to their chosen product.

Resources to support student achievement

Teachers may also like to use the Massey University MuFTi Kit material Using PGPR. This kit includes teaching materials and resources that support students to understand calculating cost and product yield.

Other resources

  • Brown, A. (2008). Understanding Food – Principles and Preparation, 4th Edition. Brooks/Cole.
  • Campbell-Platt, G. (ed). (2009). Food Science and Technology. Wiley Blackwell.
  • Hallam, E. (2005). Understanding Industrial Practices in Food Technology.
  • Nelson Thornes.
  • Hutton, T. (2001). Food Manufacturing: An Overview (Key topics in Food Science
  • and Technology No 4). Campden & Chorleywood Food Research Association.
  • Murano, P. (2002). Understanding Food Science and Technology. Brooks/Cole.

Assessment for qualifications

The following achievement standard could assess learning outcomes from this learning objective:

  • AS91643 Processing technologies 3.60: Implement complex procedures to process a specified product.

Key messages from the standard

Two of the processing standards related at Level 1 and 2 (concepts and procedures) have been progressed to one standard at Level 3. This standard requires both understanding and demonstration of complex procedures.

  • Complex procedures in processing refer to selecting and sequencing processing operations and tests; and developing health and safety, and quality assurance plans to make a successful product. Complex procedures are those that require a diverse range of processing operations to be performed in a particular order based on knowledge of techniques, operations, and testing feedback. This standard also requires calculation of yield and projection of costs and analysis of final costs compared to the projected.
  • Materials in the context of this standard may include: food ingredients, plant extracts, micro-organisms, concrete, fibre glass, woodchips, recycled materials, and resins.

The step up from level 2: The difference in achieved, merit and excellence criteria

  • In general the progression between levels (1-3) and within standards across grades (AME) in the Processing Technologies standards are: 
    • Level 1 – Basic 
    • Level 2 – Advanced
    • Level 3 – Complex
  • Skill-related descriptors that differentiate A-M-E are: 
    • A – implement procedures  
    • M – skilfully implement procedures   
    • E – efficiently implement procedures. Criteria and explanatory notes unpack these in detail at level 3.
  • However a major difference at level 3 is the nature of the processes undertaken as described in the achieved criteria where students must demonstrate additional competencies to the usual step up regarding independence, accuracy and economy of time, materials and effort.
  • Note: Excellence “with independence and accuracy” is as for merit - there is no step up in this aspect of the criteria. Unlike levels 1 and 2 there are discreet criteria that describe additional tasks within the merit and excellence levels:
  • At merit the student must, in addition to the criteria for achieved, and while showing independence and accuracy when executing complex procedures, demonstrate that they have predicted costs and compare actual and predicted costs per unit of finished product.
  • In addition at excellence while executing complex procedures in a manner that economises time, effort and materials, they must demonstrate that they have taken into account yield and cost.

Last updated October 31, 2013



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