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Knowledge of digital information management DTG 7-1

Achievement standard 2.40 AS91367

Knowledge of digital information management focuses on how information is managed at both an individual user level and with shared information within an organisation.

Learning objective: DTG 7-1

Students will:

  • demonstrate understanding of advanced digital information management tools and systems.

Indicators

Students can:

  • explain the file management considerations related to shared information 
  • explain the role of an information system for managing shared information within an organisation, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of an information system for managing shared information within an organisation 
  • identify the input, storage, retrieval and manipulation of data within an information system 
  • discuss ethical and legal issues related to shared information within an organisation and the implications for procedures and conventions for privacy and permission 
  • explain the implications of back up procedures and conventions for information systems within an organisation, and evaluate the backup procedures and conventions for information systems used within an organisation 
  • evaluate procedures and conventions for privacy and permissions used within an organisation 
  • evaluate the effectiveness of an information system for managing shared information within an organisation. 

Progression

At level 6, students learn about basic concepts of information management in relation to producing digital information outcomes. This includes understanding the key features of operating systems and common application software, file management procedures, and ethical issues related to the management of information.

At level 7, students progress to learning about advanced concepts of information systems within organisations. The focus at level 7 is on how an information system in an organisation is used to manage shared information.

Teacher guidance

To support students to develop understandings about advanced digital information management tools and systems at level 7, teachers could:

  • guide students on how to research the information management issues related to shared information within an organisation 
  • provide students with opportunities to explain file management considerations related to shared information and the related procedures and conventions for privacy and permission 
  • provide students with opportunities to discuss ethical and legal issues related to shared information within an organisation 
  • provide students with opportunities to evaluate backup procedures and conventions for information systems within an organisation 
  • provide students with opportunities to evaluate the effectiveness of information systems for managing shared information within an organisation 
  • ensure students understand the requirement at this level to look at information management issues related to shared information and information systems within an organisation 
  • ensure students have access to a suitable organisation to use for the case study 
  • support students to prepare reports, including ways to structure a report and literacy strategies to support report writing in a way that will allow students to describe, explain, discuss, and evaluate 
  • ensure students have opportunities to practice report writing.

Contexts for teaching and learning

This learning objective is about demonstrating understanding of information systems and managing shared information in an organisation. Although some generic teaching about information systems will be useful, it is important that there is a specific organisation for students to study. Teachers need to ensure the selected organisation will be one where students can find the necessary information. Students are unlikely to be able to develop sufficient understanding of the organisation if they are only looking at the organisation in terms of their own experience as a consumer – some additional research into the organisation is expected over and above what you would know as a customer or consumer.

Teachers will need to ensure students have an understanding of what an information system is. Students should understand the role of a shared information system by knowing how the five components (hardware, software, data, procedures, and people) interact. The use of annotated diagrams to show the components of an information system and how they interact is a useful approach for students to use when explaining an information system within an organisation.

Teachers should ensure students are aware of the Privacy Act and understand the Privacy Principles in that Act, and the implications of the Privacy Act for organisations when managing shared information.

Teachers need to teach students how to carry out research into an organisation and how to write a report about their findings including appropriately referencing all material.

An organisation may include but is not limited to: a school, a small business, a sports group, or a voluntary organisation.

Suggested approaches for accessing the knowledge underpinning this topic could include:

  • Identifying and discussing the characteristics of good information (for example, valid, reliable, timely, fit for purpose, accessible, cost effective, accurate, relevant, having the right level of detail, from a source in which the user has confidence, understandable by the user).
  • Take a walking tour of the school to “follow” the data as it travels from the classroom, through cables, wireless access points, switches to the servers and then retrieved/manipulated by staff in the school office.  The school’s IT staff are a good resource to utilise for the “tour leaders”. Whilst doing this, students can follow some data that is input, stored, retrieved, and manipulated within the school’s information system.
  • Create both public and private shares for the class in a cloud data storage, such as Drop Box. What happens when the entire class has access to all the files in the public Drop Box share? Discuss the advantages and disadvantages. When is it best for the teacher and students to have a “private” share? For example, for authenticity of assessment data. This could also lead to further discussion on who owns data within the “cloud” and any privacy or other ethical considerations.
  • Inviting the school IT technician/Network administrator and the administration staff (for example, Principal’s PA, SMS co-ordinator, website co-ordinator, communications manager) to visit your class to discuss:
    • how the school network is managed including the storage and backing up of data, access to data, security settings, privacy settings, filters, email 
    • how information is collected, managed, processed and communicated within the school and to the wider school community
    • the characteristics of good information and how this is managed within the school.
  • After the visit, have one or two class periods of debriefing:
    • encourage class discussion on the points presented
    • use the white board, large sheets of paper, shared Google Doc or other means to get students to collate and compare their notes. 
  • Visit a local business. Prior to the visit, ask students to work in pairs or small groups to research the business and to come up with three key questions pertaining to how the business manages shared information. It’s important that students have some background understandings of the business (what they do, when established, owned by, other branches).
  • Invite guest speakers to speak to your class. These could be from a small organisation such as a local sports club, a small business, a community group, a club:
    • Ensure you have provided the guest speakers with a list of questions prior to their visit, so that they cover the points required for the standard.
    • After the visit, have one or two class periods of debriefing:
      • encourage class discussion on the points presented
      • use the white board, large sheets of paper, shared Google Doc or other means to get students to collate and compare their notes.
  • Students could work in small groups to research an organisation of their choice (the teacher will need to critique the choice to ensure the organisation is acceptable and the required information is accessible).  Students could create a digital media presentation on the organisation to share their findings with the class. (A media presentation could include such outcomes as a video, a PowerPoint presentation, a Prezi, a blog, a pamphlet, an infographic.)
  • This project could be embedded into a digital media project.
  • The learning experiences should be embedded in the programme of learning as it progresses from the beginning of the year. 

Literacy considerations

Teachers need to ensure students understand the specialist language related to information management such as "information system" or "conventions for privacy and permission". In addition, students must understand the language necessary to prepare a case study about an organisation. Students need to understand words such as identify, describe, explain, discuss, and evaluate. Teachers need to give students strategies to understand what is expected for these different words – for example, what does it mean to discuss? Students need to be provided strategies on how to evaluate in order to reach the Excellence criteria. This could include using PMI (Plus, Minus, Implications) frameworks. Evaluation is the step beyond discussion as it involves drawing conclusions and making recommendations.

As students will need to produce a report about the information management in their selected organisation, teachers need to give students strategies on how to write a report. This could include such things as strategies for planning and pre-writing before actually writing the report, how to structure a report, how to write a paragraph, and how to reference correctly.

Resources to support teaching and learning

Assessment for qualifications

The following achievement standard(s) could assess learning outcomes from this learning objective:

  • AS91367 Digital technologies 2.40: Demonstrate understanding of advanced concepts relating to managing shared information within information systems

Key messages from the standard

  • This standard is about information management within an organisation. Students need to have a particular organisation they are using as a case study rather than some generalised approach about information management within organisations in general. Explanatory note 6 lists some possible organisations. Students choose one of these or another appropriate organisation.
  • It is best to look at one information system in one organisation in detail rather than looking at two or more organisations or separate information systems.
  • There are five aspects of managing shared information that need to be covered for achieved. Students must cover all five in their report. The five aspects concerning shared information within the organisation are:
    • file management considerations
    • ethical and legal issues and procedures and conventions for privacy and permission
    • back-up procedures and conventions
    • the role of an information system
    • input, storage, retrieval, and manipulation of data
  • Some aspects include multiple requirements so students need to ensure their report covers everything asked for in the standard. For example, looking at one of the five aspects above “Ethical and legal issues and procedures and conventions for privacy and permission”.

It is important that students only submit material they understand. They should write in their own words about their own experiences. Students should reference material that is not their own using appropriate referencing at the point of use. The use of information from other sources can assist the candidate to demonstrate understanding only where the candidate uses the information by one or more of the following:

  • interpreting or rewriting the information in their own words
  • relating the information to a specific context or example
  • commenting meaningfully on the information.

Resources to support student achievement

Last updated February 20, 2018



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