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AOs/LOs by level

Technological practice (TP)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3

Technological knowledge (TK)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3

Nature of technology (NT)

6-1 | 6-2

7-1 | 7-2

8-1 | 8-2

Design in technology (DET)

6-1 | 6-2

7-1 | 7-2

8-1/2

Manufacturing (MFG)

6-1 | 6-2

7-1 | 7-2

8-1/2

Technical areas (TCA)

8-1 

Construction and mechanical technologies (CMT)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3 | 6-4

6-5 | 6-6 | 6-7

7-1 |  7-2 |  7-3 |  7-4

7-5 |  7-6 |  7-7

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3 | 8-4

8-5 | 8-6 | 8-7

Design and visual communication (DVC)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3

Digital technologies (DTG)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3 | 6-4

6-5 | 6-6 | 6-7 | 6-8

6-9 | 6-10 | 6-11 | 6-12

7-1 |  7-2 |  7-3 |  7-4

7-5 |  7-6 |  7-7 |  7-8

7-9 |  7-10 |  7-11 |  7-12

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3 | 8-4

8-5 |  8-6/7 | 8-8 | 8-9

8-10 |  8-11 | 8-12

Processing technologies (PRT)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1/2 | 8-3


Demonstrate understanding of advanced manufacturing concepts and techniques MFG 7-1

Achievement standard 2.12 AS91365

Knowledge of manufacturing focuses on the underpinning concepts of manufacturing. This covers the systems and processes used in the production of goods.

Learning objective: MFG 7-1

Students will:

  • demonstrate understanding of advanced manufacturing concepts and techniques.

Indicators

Students can:

  • communicate manufacturing processes by using process flow and system diagrams
  • explain why particular types of manufacturing systems are used in specified contexts
  • discuss the application of a range of techniques to meet production requirements
  • discuss how yield prediction and its determination, and quality control mechanisms, may be affected by social and environmental change.

Progression

Previously at level 6, students have learned about different manufacturing systems and various categories of manufacturing techniques. At level 7, students progress to advanced understandings that also include broader concepts such as the use and availability of resources and political, social, economic, and environmental factors. Students demonstrating competencies at level 7 are required to demonstrate their understanding of manufacturing by communicating manufacturing processes using process flow and system diagrams, investigate manufacturing systems used in specific contexts with associated production techniques, and how yield prediction and its determination, and quality control mechanisms, may be affected by social and environmental change.

Note: Students will need to draw on previous knowledge of manufacturing from curriculum level 6.

Teacher guidance

To support students to develop understandings about advanced manufacturing concepts and techniques at level 7, teachers could:

  • support students with their understanding of how quality management techniques impact on manufacturing products 
  • present advanced technologies to students such as CNC, PLC or SCADA systems 
  • ensure students understand key drivers on manufacturing such as customer, social, environmental, and safety imperatives.

Contexts for teaching and learning

Learning about manufacturing can be incorporated into a teaching and learning programme where students design and create technological outcomes to meet a developed brief, and use knowledge of modelling and materials/systems within this context (refer to MFG 7-2). This objective and subsequent assessment is about demonstrating understanding and knowledge of manufacturing while not necessarily developing a manufacturing process or system or creating multiple products as a result of designing the manufacturing process.

This also links to brief development, planning for practice, outcome development and evaluation, technological modelling and technological products and systems, where students implement a one-off solution and then move into considering manufacturing concepts.

Key teaching points to consider:

  • Select a context where students will have access to information on safety issues, new technologies and/or techniques, and quality management techniques. This information could be collected through industry visits, visiting speakers, and from online sources.
  • Safety issues in manufacturing include those associated with the outcome, the workers involved in its production, and environmental impacts.
  • New technologies and/or techniques may include but are not limited to: computer numerical controlled (CNC) machine tools, electronics assemblies, programmable logic control (PLC), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) control systems, force field analysis and the use of robotics.
  • Types of manufacturing systems include but are not limited to:
    • one-off custom manufacturing of a unique single product
    • batch, intermittent or short-run manufacturing – multiple copies of the same product or a single batch of a processed product
    • continuous ("assembly line") manufacture
    • flexible manufacture and customisation. 
  • Quality management techniques may include but are not limited to: Total Quality Management (TQM) and Six Sigma.
  • Manufacturing processes may include but are not limited to: milk powder manufacture, beer brewing, meat packing and freezing, carpet manufacture, urea from natural gas, newsprint, oil refining, injection moulded plastics, electronics, fish filleting and freezing, rotationally moulded plastics, superphosphate, agricultural machinery, possum and merino yarn, marine/leisure products, niche furniture and garment manufacture.

Choosing the context for the learning and assessment

  • The teacher may specify the context for the activity in discussion with the class and/or you may allow individual students to negotiate an alternative context.
  • The students may present their report in any appropriate format and medium that they have agreed with you in advance. For example, they could present it as a slideshow, a display board, a written report, or a portfolio. Creating the report is an individual activity, but students may investigate the selected manufacturing process either independently, with a partner, or in a group.

To support student learning, videos showing how familiar everyday products are manufactured would be a useful resource to use.

Literacy considerations

Students will require support and become independent in their ability to identify, explain, and discuss in the context of manufacturing.

Students will need to be able to confidently communicate the following:

  • Explain how safety issues were addressed in a manufacturing process.
  • Identify the impacts of new technologies and/or techniques on the suitability of different types of manufacturing systems and increased possibilities for quality control.
  • Identify the influences of customer, social, and environmental drivers on priorities within a manufacturing process.
  • Explain how quality management techniques have impacted on a manufacturing process.
  • Discuss how and why quality management techniques have been important in changing manufacturing practices.
  • Note the following definitions:
    • to identify is to state an idea
    • to describe is a statement that gives details about the outcome or idea
    • to explain is to describe in detail with reasons – often including the how and why
    • to discuss requires an explanation that is comprehensive, detailed, broad and show evidence of some complexity in thinking. It may be a reasoned argument presenting a particular point of view, a comparison and contrast between two ideas or concepts, or it may be a detailed reasoning and relationship between several complex ideas.

Students will also need to develop skills such as:

  • communicating ideas – graphically and in an annotated format
  • undertaking research and using this to inform their work-sift-sort and synthesise information
  • using correct conventions in flow charting a manufacturing process
  • using the specialised vocabulary of manufacturing, flow charting, and quality control and quality management (demonstrating understanding of such things as HACCP or Six Sigma systems).

Resources to support teaching and learning

Case study material

General resources

Total Quality Management and Six Sigma resources

Assessment for qualifications

The following achievement standard could assess learning outcomes from this learning objective:

  • AS91618 Generic technology 3.13: Undertake development and implementation of a ‘green’ manufacturing process

Key messages from the standard

Students are required to demonstrate understanding of the following:

  • Knowledge of manufacturing focusing on the underpinning concepts of manufacturing.
  • The systems and processes used in the production of goods.
  • Different manufacturing systems and various categories of manufacturing techniques.
  • How to flow chart a manufacturing process.
  • The use and availability of resources and political, social, economic and environmental factors.

Key definitions

Safety issues in manufacturing include those associated with the outcome, the workers involved in its production, and environmental impacts.

New technologies and/or techniques may include but are not limited to: computer numerical controlled (CNC) machine tools, electronics assemblies, programmable logic control (PLC), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) control systems, force field analysis.

Types of manufacturing systems include but are not limited to:

  • one-off custom manufacturing of a unique single product
  • batch, intermittent or short-run manufacturing – multiple copies of the same product or a single batch of a processed product
  • continuous (often called “assembly line”) manufacture
  • flexible manufacture and customisation.

Quality management techniques may include, but are not limited to: Total Quality Management (TQM) and Six Sigma.

Students require access to the understandings associated with a manufacturing process. This might include making a site visit, having a manufacturing specialist visit the classroom and/or accessing information via the internet or videos. The assessor may decide that students focus on the same manufacturing process or that students choose an area of personal interest.

Resources to support student achievement

Last updated March 26, 2018



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