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Pattern making CMT 7-7

Achievement standard 2.26 AS91350

Pattern making includes skills in pattern adaptation and pattern drafting. Pattern drafting requires a pattern block or working drawing to be established by using key measurements and using these to develop a pattern, which interprets a garment’s or item’s design including its special features. Patterns are tested using toiles and mock-ups to ensure that pattern pieces correctly interpret a design and its special features.

Learning objective: CMT 7-7

Students will:

  • make advanced adaptations to a pattern to change structural and/or style features of a design.

Indicators

Students can:

  • undertake advanced adaptations to a pattern that has three or more pieces, by making changes to pieces to enable structural and/or style design features to be achieved
  • correctly labelling the adapted pattern with grain line, cutting information, pattern piece names, dots and notches
  • demonstrate independence and accuracy when constructing a toile/or mock-up; testing and refining the pattern where necessary to ensure the final pattern correctly interprets the design and provides the correct fit for the body or item
  • undertake advanced pattern adaptation in a manner that economises time, effort, and materials.

Progression

At level 6, students learn how to select and adapt existing patterns to enable a garment to correctly fit the body, or an item to meet desired size and fit specifications. At level 7 this should progress to students learning how to make advanced adaptations to patterns and test these using toiles and/or mock-ups to ensure the final pattern correctly interprets a design and its special features. Students also learn how to develop a pattern guide sheet that incorporates appropriate language, symbols and/or diagrams to communicate pattern layout, and the step by step instructions required to construct a garment or item.

Teacher guidance

To support students to make advanced adaptations to a pattern to change structural and/or style features of a design at level 7, teachers could:

  • provide opportunity for students to undertake advanced adaptations to a pattern, which has three or more pieces, by making changes to pieces to enable structural and/or style design features to be achieved 
    • such features requiring advanced pattern adaptation may include: manipulated darts, sleeves; added pleats, gores, yokes, button wraps, facings and collars; deep buttoning, waterproof openings, and changing the types of fastenings 
  • guide students to correctly label the adapted pattern with grain line, cutting information, pattern piece names, dots and notches
  • guide students to demonstrate independence and accuracy when constructing a toile/or mock-up; testing and refining the pattern where necessary to ensure the final pattern correctly interprets the design and provides the correct fit for the body or item
  • guide students to undertake advanced pattern adaptation in a manner that economises time, effort, and materials.

Contexts for teaching and learning

This learning objective is about implementing advanced adaptations to a pattern to change structural and/or style features of a design. However, within a programme of work it is possible to link these skills with knowledge of advanced concepts used to make textile products – refer to learning objective CMT 7-4 Knowledge of textiles construction and/or implementing advanced procedures to make a specified product with special features. Refer to CMT 7-2 Implement advanced procedures to make a textiles product.

This objective relates to a wider range of textile items such as pattern adaptations for equipment coverings, furnishings, garments, animal coverings. These could include such adaptations as the following:

  • adding fullness to enable inside pockets to be added to a garment
  • altering the dart direction
  • adding sleeves
  • altering the neckline
  • altering the hem shape 
  • making the pattern fit a bigger or smaller object
  • adding or removing a particular section to change shape and function
  • including a new function (for example, a pocket for tools)
  • adding zips to make the article or garment easier to use/put on 

This achievement objective requires the student to make at least two advanced adaptations to a pattern to enable the changing of structural and/or style features. This could be to change a fitted sleeve to a puffed sleeve and add a collar with a facing to a tunic pattern, or adding valances to a soft cover for a lounge suite.

Two approaches are possible:

  1. The students are given or have developed a conceptual design. The conceptual design will be a drawing of the garment (an existing design) with the proposed changes to structural and/or style features, for example, the change to include puffed sleeves and a collar to a tunic. The whole class then makes the same product (or one of the alternatives). The teacher may select the conceptual design in discussion with the class. They may also allow individual students to negotiate a variation of the selected conceptual design and pattern alterations.
  2. The students have been engaged in technological practice and are ready to adapt a pattern to achieve the structural and style features of the design.

Note: Students are required to make at least two advanced adaptations, which could be either structural or style features or one of each.

Prior learning

In either case, before they begin to make their adaptations and toile, ensure that students:

  • know how to select a pattern that has a similar style to their design apart from the feature that needs to be adapted; for example, for a tunic pattern with a puffed sleeve and collar they would need to start with a tunic pattern with a fitted sleeve and no collar and a neckline that could easily take the intended collar shape
  • are introduced to the concepts of advanced pattern adaptations (for example, slash and spread, moving darts within a pattern, the different types of collars and how to draft them, sleeve manipulations) and practice structural and style adaptations (for example, moving a shoulder dart to a bust dart) – see the students' instructions for suggestions of structural and style feature adaptations
  • know how to interpret pattern adaptation instructions such as those found in a pattern making text
  • can construct their adaptation and schedule this into their overall construction plan for a garment
  • know how to label the pattern and its adaptations with the correct symbols and information to enable the construction to be straightforward
  • practice identifying the correct fit of a garment and fitting points of various garment pieces to ensure that an adaptation is successful (for example, for a sleeve, the sleeve head is sitting on the shoulder, the arm can move freely in the sleeve, the gathering is spread evenly in the sleeve head)
  • practice refining a pattern adaptation to ensure it interprets the design (for example, if the sleeve head is too puffy, repeat the adaptation and remove some of the fullness)
  • select materials and special features that provide sufficient scope to meet the requirements of the standard
  • have access to an appropriate work environment and to the tools and materials they will need to safely make their product. Teachers and students should be familiar with Safety in Technology Education: A Guidance Manual for New Zealand Schools and the implications of the relevant sections when it comes to students implementing their construction processes.

Literacy considerations

Students will need to understand the language of pattern drafting and the specific symbols used in pattern preparation

This would include:

  • knowing how to interpret pattern adaptation instructions such as those found in a pattern making text
  • able to create a pattern guide sheet
  • be able to label the pattern with the correct symbols and information to enable the construction of the garment.

Resources to support teaching and learning

Technology Online case study material

Books

  • Patternmaking for Fashion Design (5th Edition.) Texts by Helen Joseph Armstrong, Published by Prentice Hall 2009.
  • Dress Pattern Designing by Natalie Bray, published by John Wiley and Sons 2003.
  • Fast Fit: Easy Pattern Alterations for Every Figure by Sandra Betzina, published by Taunton press 2001.
  • Fitting solutions: Pattern altering tips for garments that fit, published by Taunton press 1996.

Assessment for qualifications

The following achievement standard(s) could assess learning outcomes from this learning objective:

  • AS91350 Construction and mechanical technologies 2.26: Make advanced adaptations to a pattern to change the structural and style features of a design

Key messages from the standard

Teachers must ensure that the pattern changes being made at this level are advanced, rather than basic as required at curriculum level 6. For example, lengthening a pattern is not considered to be an advanced adaptation. Evidence should be such that it is clear that the requirements as outlined in Explanatory note 2 have been met. For example, details as to the measurements, testing, and refinements that students carried out should be apparent. For a student at merit, the assessor could note further observations on the assessment schedule. For example, that the student ensured understanding by checking measurements and pattern adaptations with the teacher, made notes, and constructed part of the garment before beginning the assessment.

The following section from the standard highlights the competencies required:

  • the selection of a suitable pattern to be adapted for the design
  • undertaking advanced adaptations of the pattern
  • ongoing testing of toiles or mock-ups to refine the pattern as required to ensure the adapted pattern interprets the design and provides the correct fit for the body or item
  • correctly labelling the pattern with grainline, cutting information, pattern piece names, dots and notches
  • constructing a final toile or mock-up of the adapted pattern to ensure the final pattern correctly interprets the design
  • Pattern suitable to adapt and use in this achievement standard refers to a commercial pattern that is professionally produced, or an alternative that provides similar structure and guidance using technical language and symbols. This may include but is not limited to teacher provided blocks or computer generated patterns, with accompanying guide sheets. The pattern must include a minimum of three pattern pieces and may be provided by the teacher or selected by the student.
  • The design can be for a textile or alternative soft material product which requires "fitting" to meet the requirements of a specific person or item. Products may include but are not limited to garments, equipment coverings, and furnishings.
  • Advanced adaptations refer to making changes to pattern pieces to enable the inclusion of structural and/or style features into an existing design. Advanced adaptations include but are not limited to: manipulating darts, sleeves, adding pleats, gores, yokes, button wraps, facings and collars, deep buttoning, waterproof opening, and changing types of fastenings.
  • Materials include textiles or alternative soft materials and may include but are not limited to natural and synthetic: fibres, yarns, fabrics, leather, and vinyl.
  • Toile or mock-up refers to a particular method of functional modelling involving the production of a sample product. Its purpose is to translate the pattern into 3 dimensions to check all aspects of the design have been interpreted appropriately and provide the correct fit for the person or item.
  • Tests used to determine if the pattern provides the correct fit may include but are not limited to checking: 
    • toile or mock-up accurately and coherently incorporate the desired structural and style features into an existing design  
    • correct size for the intended wearer or item  
    • appropriate opening to ensure ease of putting on and taking off  
    • darts placed to shape for fullness  
    • shoulder length is accurate  
    • fit is comfortable to wearer  
    • the fabric falls as intended with no bunching, pulling or gaping.

Resources to support student achievement

Last updated March 26, 2018



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