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Construct a resistant materials product CMT 7-1

Achievement standard 2.20 AS91344

Construct a resistant materials product requires students to implement procedures and tests to make specified products using resistant materials.

Resistant materials may include but are not limited to: wood, composites, metal, alloys, ceramics, and plastics. Constructing using resistant materials requires particular techniques and procedures to be undertaken to enable materials to be skilfully and safely measured, cut, shaped, joined, and finished to make quality products. Advanced procedures require advanced craft skills to ensure the product meets the specifications.

Achievement objective: CMT 7-1

Students will:

  • implement advanced procedures to make a resistant materials product.

Indicators

Students can:

  • undertake advanced procedures to construct a product with special features that meets specifications
  • select and apply scheduled techniques to comply with relevant health and safety regulations
  • show independence and accuracy in executing the scheduled techniques and tests
  • undertake techniques and tests in a manner that economises time, effort, and materials.

Progression

At level 6, students learn to perform a sequence of techniques and tests to make resistant materials products that meet specifications. Students should progress at level 7 to performing advanced procedures to make a high-quality resistant materials product that meets specifications and incorporates special features.

Teacher guidance

To support students to implement advanced procedures to make a resistant materials product at level 7, teachers could:

  • ensure students are aware of a wide range of measuring, cutting, shaping, joining, and finishing techniques
  • provide students with the opportunity to discuss what is meant by advanced procedures; that is, procedures that require the student to make informed selection and scheduling of techniques and testing to make the product
  • support students to undertake evaluative tests to demonstrate that the final product meets specifications
  • provide opportunity for students to explore and discuss advanced procedures in terms of skilfulness and efficiency
  • ensure students have an appropriate environment, tools, and materials to enable students to work safely with resistant materials to make a product
  • provide opportunity to explore what techniques are most suitable for use with a variety of resistant materials
  • provide students with the opportunity to schedule and practice a range of techniques and tests to develop quality products (this may be through completing a range of individual products and/or joint class projects/activities).

Contexts for teaching and learning

This objective requires the student to implement advanced procedures using resistant materials such as wood, metal, plastic, and glass to make a product. This learning objective is about implementing advanced procedures to make a textiles product with special features. However, within a programme of work it is possible to link these skills with knowledge of advanced concepts used to make products using resistant materials (refer to learning objective CMT 7-3 Knowledge of resistant materials construction).

Teachers must ensure that students have the necessary skill set, techniques and processes appropriate/relating to advanced craft skills, which are related to this level of the curriculum, and they have the opportunity to practice these prior to any assessment. Teachers need to ensure that the projects that students are working on include special features, both aesthetic and structural.

Two approaches are possible when structuring the learning programme:

  1. The students are given a set of basic plans for a product, which they can modify to suit the purpose of their specific product. The whole class then makes the same product. The teacher may select basic plans and the special features in discussion with the class. They may also allow individual students to negotiate a variation of the selected drawing and special features.
  2. The students have been engaged in technological practice and are now at the point where they have fully established the specifications for their technological outcome (which must include at least two special features, one from each of the two categories) and are ready to make it.

The specified product to be constructed must include two special features and require the consistent application of accepted conventions in advanced craft skills.

Examples of some specific special features could be taken from the following, but are not restricted to, as these must be contextualised in the product being constructed within its intended environment:

Structural

  • The fabrication and welding of the frame, requiring consistent application of acceptable tolerances to fit and align the framing tubes to achieve structural strength and an ergonomic fit to the driver.
  • The machining of components for the rear axle to fit the bearings, which requires consistent application of parallel, taper, boring and face turning, and machining to allow the bearings to have a reduction or press fit.
  • Bracing the table to withstand side loadings without racking/moving.
  • Storage facilities that allow easy access to other items.
  • Enabling the multiple use of the furniture, for example, converting from an air hockey table to a coffee table.

Aesthetic

  • The shaping of the seat to fit the driver, requiring the consistent application of symmetry and anthropometric data to ensure that the seat is an ergonomic design.
  • Placing decal on the finished go-kart to enhance its appearance and personalise it to the driver.
  • Machining the top of the table to inlay a chess board made from different woods.
  • Four identically turned legs or other decorative feature designed to complement existing furniture in the room where it will be located.

Students should have the opportunity to learn and practice advanced craft skills, which rely on the consistent application of accepted conventions. These may relate to such things as flush, parallel, perpendicular, offset, symmetry, array, tolerance, ease, press fit, clearances, eccentricity, taper.

Teachers and students should be familiar with Safety in Technology Education: A Guidance Manual for New Zealand Schools and the implications of the relevant sections when it comes to students implementing their construction processes.

Literacy considerations

Students will need to understand the following terminology:

  • Advanced procedures require advanced skills that rely on the consistent application of accepted conventions, which may relate to such things as flush, parallel, perpendicular, offset, symmetry, array, tolerance, ease, press fit, clearances, eccentricity, and taper.
  • Specified product refers to a product and its relevant specifications, including material specifications. The specifications must be of sufficient rigour to allow the student to meet the standard. The specifications need to be agreed prior to the product being made. They may be teacher-given or developed in negotiation with the student.
  • Special features are those that rely on the application of advanced craft skills to achieve the specified product for this objective, and will require one or more special features from each of the categories below:
    • structural, such things as mortise and tenon joint, lapped dovetailed drawer, annealed component, mig-welded panels, sand casted component, milling an advanced component
    • aesthetic, such things as parquetry, inlaid design, turned table legs, taper turned component, dressed edges.
  • Specifications define the requirements of the physical and functional nature of the product that are measurable.
  • Testing procedures may include but are not limited to measuring, trialling techniques, fitting, and visual checks.

Resources to support teaching and learning

Technology Online case study material

General resources

Health and safety procedures

Assessment for qualifications

The following achievement standard(s) could assess learning outcomes from this learning objective:

  • AS91344 Construction and mechanical technologies 2.20 – Implement advanced procedures using resistant materials to make a specified product with special features

Key messages from the standard

It is essential that projects for this assessment include the two special features (that is, one structural and one aesthetic feature). If this is not the case, students cannot achieve the standard. Students must select the techniques to be used to construct these special features. Providing instructions that outline the techniques to be followed (which is acceptable at level 6) does not allow this selection to occur. Testing should be such that it is monitoring the construction of the special features and also demonstrating that the product meets the specifications. For example, one student may measure and fit to ensure a successful lap of a dovetail drawer. Another student may undertake testing to ensure the dimensions and performance of their skateboard (as defined in their brief) are met.

Students must be familiar with the explanatory notes from the standard that cover the following:

  • Specified product (EN4) with special features refers to a product and its relevant specifications, including material and manufacturing specifications.
  • Advanced procedures (EN 5 and 7) are those that require advanced craft skills. Advanced craft skills rely on the consistent application of accepted conventions. These may relate to such things as flush, parallel, perpendicular, offset, symmetry, array, tolerance, ease, press fit, clearances, eccentricity, taper.
  • Special features (EN6) are those that rely on the application of advanced craft skills to achieve the specified product for this achievement standard, and will require one or more special features from each of the categories below:
    • structural – for example, mortise and tenon joint, lapped dovetailed drawer, annealed component, mig-welded panels, sandcasted component, milling an advanced component
    • aesthetic – for example, parquetry, inlaid design, turned table legs, taper turned component, dressed edges.
  • Testing procedures (EN8) may include but are not limited to measuring, trialling techniques, fitting, and visual checks. These are specific to the selected features and products.

In addition, students should also be aware of the importance of the specifications that define the requirements of the physical and functional nature of the product, which are measurable.

Teachers must be able to justify assessment judgments by providing evidence based on classroom observations and discussions with students. As the teacher, you need to be able to demonstrate that your judgments are soundly based. This means some recording of evidence is necessary. However, recording of evidence should not be time-consuming or onerous. Students could be asked simply to keep a record of progress and how they have resolved problems – maybe by annotating construction plans or the equivalent. You could add your own observations to the students’ records.

Students could also provide evidence by:

  • establishing a schedule of tests (that is will be done and when), and recording the outcomes of the tests as they apply them 
  • by taking and annotating photos to show economic use of materials and accuracy.

Judgments

  • Independence can be gauged from the level of teacher input required, and from observation of student interactions.
  • Accuracy of execution can be seen in the processes used in the finished product, and in how the student has followed through on information from testing.
  • Economy of time is gauged by observation and relates to how effectively students organise themselves, look after their resources so that they can pick up where they left off the previous period, and minimise downtime.
  • Economy of effort is a measure of efficiency. To what extent does the student know what to do and get on and do it rather than relying on trial and error? It can be gauged from classroom observation and/or planning logs.
  • Economy of resources is gauged by the extent to which a student makes use of materials.
  • Economy of time, effort and resources could be demonstrated in one action. For example, students could chose the correct tool for the task, which saves them time and effort and minimises wastage.
    • Economy of time and effort are often linked.

Evidence of assessment

Students could provide evidence by establishing a schedule of tests and recording the outcomes, and taking and annotating photos. Annotating an assessment schedule is one way for the assessor to confirm judgments around independence and accuracy (for merit) and if the student has worked in a manner that economises time, effort and materials (excellence). These annotations could be derived from classroom observation and/or discussions with students.

This evidence will be provided by individual students and could be presented in a portfolio, in a PowerPoint, in a video of an oral presentation or in other forms negotiated with the teacher. Evidence could include a variety of media (for example, written, digital, photographic) in any format. It is recommended that where written format is used, there be a maximum size of A3. Evidence will also be based on assessor observation of the manner in which the techniques are carried out. Evidence needs to be organised in a way that clearly demonstrates the student’s ability to implement advanced procedures using resistant materials to make a specified product.

Resources to support student achievement

Last updated June 8, 2018



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