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Theme: World and local issues

Our class | Exploring an issue | Water woes | Poverty | Links | Achievement standards

Getting to know our class

Introductory activity at beginning of the year with the purpose of getting to know our class.

  • Gathering data from all students in the class.
  • Student generated questionnaire, mixture of qualitative and quantitative questions/data.
  • Brainstorm areas to explore, for example:
    • sports/hobbies
    • cultural
    • jobs
    • travel and distance to school
    • issues of concern or interest
    • you and maths
    • physical measurements, for example, heights, armspan, wrist circumference, popliteal length, hand length and width, foot length and width.
  • Use of resources such as Survey Monkey or UoA statistics department survey generator to gather data.
  • Follow up work around probability, for example, two-way tables.
  • Investigative questions to consider:
    • What stories do the data tell us?
    • Are we typical of our year level in this school?
    • Are we typical of other students of our year level in NZ? Internationally?
    • What is the chance that a student in year 11 in this school is Maori and studies both maths and art?

Activity: Culturally locating our students in the class

Possible achievement objectives

Select from below depending on the teaching and learning activities chosen.

Number strategies and knowledge

  • NA5-1 Reason with linear proportions.
  • NA5-4 Use rates and ratios.

Measurement

  • GM5-1Select and use appropriate metric units for length, area, volume and capacity, weight (mass), temperature, angle, and time, with awareness that measurements are approximate.
  • GM5-2 Convert between metric units, using decimals.
  • GM6-1 Measure at a level of precision appropriate to the task.

Statistical investigation

  • S5-1 Plan and conduct surveys and experiments using the statistical enquiry cycle:
    • A – determining appropriate variables and measures
    • B – considering sources of variation
    • C – gathering and cleaning data
    • D – using multiple displays, and re-categorising data to find patterns, variations, relationships, and trends in multivariate data sets
    • E – comparing sample distributions visually, using measures of centre, spread, and proportion
    • F – presenting a report of findings.
  • S6-1 Plan and conduct investigations using the statistical enquiry cycle:
    • A – justifying the variables and measures used
    • B – managing sources of variation, including through the use of random sampling
    • C – identifying and communicating features in context (trends, relationships between variables, and differences within and between distributions), using multiple displays
    • D – making informal inferences about populations from sample data
    • E – justifying findings, using displays and measures.

Probability

  • S5-3 Compare and describe the variation between theoretical and experimental distributions in situations that involve elements of chance.
  • S5-4 Calculate probabilities, using fractions, percentages, and ratios.
  • S6-3 Investigate situations that involve elements of chance:
    • A – comparing discrete theoretical distributions and experimental distributions, appreciating the role of sample size
    • B – calculating probabilities in discrete situations.

Exploring an issue in depth

Using the data to choose some areas to explore further, to base future mathematical and statistical exploration around. These will change as the current issues change. For example:

  • raising the age for a driver's licence
  • raising/lowering the drinking age
  • minimum wage – saving for a car/phone/other crucial teenage need.

Drinking age

Links to Health and PE. Need to consider carefully what might be appropriate and applicable to the students in your community. The examples could be modified to use with soft drinks/hot drinks.

Surely if you are old enough to marry, you are old enough to buy a bottle of wine?

  • Volume of different containers, for example, cans, drink bottles – plastic, glass, different drinking glasses.
  • Energy drinks – sugar and caffeine content.
  • Proportion of drinks that are alcohol, additives etc (sugar, fats, additives for soft drinks).
  • Relationship between body mass and absorption rate and ‘decay’.
  • Intake versus inebriation? (Sugar levels/hyperactivity for soft drinks.)
  • Effects on male versus female.
  • Effect of food (on hyperactivity for soft drinks).
  • How many standard drinks in a bottle?
  • Taxes on different drinks, what percentage is tax?
  • Exploring drink related accidents and injuries; deaths due to drinking; drinking age across different countries:
  • Drinking age and number of drink related accidents for different age categories.
  • Distinguishing between different types of cola.

You can’t fool me by giving me a cheap cola! (Word, 121 KB)

Possible achievement objectives

Select from below depending on the teaching and learning activities chosen.

Number strategies and knowledge

  • NA5-1 Reason with linear proportions.
  • NA5-4 Use rates and ratios.

Measurement

  • GM5-1Select and use appropriate metric units for length, area, volume and capacity, weight (mass), temperature, angle, and time, with awareness that measurements are approximate.
  • GM5-2 Convert between metric units, using decimals.
  • GM6-1 Measure at a level of precision appropriate to the task.

Statistical investigation

  • S5-1 Plan and conduct surveys and experiments using the statistical enquiry cycle:
    • D – using multiple displays, and re-categorising data to find patterns, variations, relationships, and trends in multivariate data sets
    • E – comparing sample distributions visually, using measures of centre, spread, and proportion
    • F – presenting a report of findings.
  • S6-1 Plan and conduct investigations using the statistical enquiry cycle:
    • C – identifying and communicating features in context (trends, relationships between variables, and differences within and between distributions), using multiple displays
    • D – making informal inferences about populations from sample data
    • E – justifying findings, using displays and measures.

Statistical literacy

  • S5-2 Evaluate statistical investigations or probability activities undertaken by others, including data collection methods, choice of measures, and validity of findings.
  • S6-2 Evaluate statistical reports in the media by relating the displays, statistics, processes, and probabilities used to the claims made.

Probability

  • S5-3 Compare and describe the variation between theoretical and experimental distributions in situations that involve elements of chance.
  • S5-4 Calculate probabilities, using fractions, percentages, and ratios.
  • S6-3 Investigate situations that involve elements of chance:
    • A – comparing discrete theoretical distributions and experimental distributions, appreciating the role of sample size
    • B – calculating probabilities in discrete situations.

Water woes – global issue

Possible ideas to explore:

  • Saving water –
    • How much water could you save each year if you turned off the tap whilst you were brushing your teeth?
    • How much water could you save if you had one minute less in the shower? Or only had x minute showers?
    • How much water could you save if you changed the shower head to a more water efficient one?
    • Hygiene issues vs saving issues.

Activity: Water woes

  • How clean is:
    • your tap water?
    • your local stream water?
    • your local river water?
    • o Links with science and education for sustainability.
  • 'If you live in a slum in Manila, you pay more for your water than people living in London.' ( Global issues – Water and development):
    • Explore water facts given in the media/online.
    • Scale up, scale down, reflect in relationship to local situation.

Possible achievement objectives

Select from below depending on the teaching and learning activities chosen.

Number strategies and knowledge

  • NA5-1 Reason with linear proportions.
  • NA5-4 Use rates and ratios.

Measurement

  • GM5-1Select and use appropriate metric units for length, area, volume and capacity, weight (mass), temperature, angle, and time, with awareness that measurements are approximate.
  • GM5-2 Convert between metric units, using decimals.
  • GM6-1 Measure at a level of precision appropriate to the task.

Statistical investigation

  • S5-1 Plan and conduct surveys and experiments using the statistical enquiry cycle:
    • D – using multiple displays, and re-categorising data to find patterns, variations, relationships, and trends in multivariate data sets
    • E – comparing sample distributions visually, using measures of centre, spread, and proportion
    • F – presenting a report of findings.
  • S6-1 Plan and conduct investigations using the statistical enquiry cycle:
    • C – identifying and communicating features in context (trends, relationships between variables, and differences within and between distributions), using multiple displays
    • D – making informal inferences about populations from sample data
    • E – justifying findings, using displays and measures.

Statistical literacy

  • S5-2 Evaluate statistical investigations or probability activities undertaken by others, including data collection methods, choice of measures, and validity of findings.
  • S6-2 Evaluate statistical reports in the media by relating the displays, statistics, processes, and probabilities used to the claims made.

Poverty - global relief (in brief)

Possible achievement objectives

Select from below depending on the teaching and learning activities chosen.

Probability

  • S5-3 Compare and describe the variation between theoretical and experimental distributions in situations that involve elements of chance.
  • S5-4 Calculate probabilities, using fractions, percentages, and ratios.
  • S6-3 Investigate situations that involve elements of chance:

Links

Achievement standards

Learning from this theme could potentially provide evidence towards the following achievement standards.

  • AS91026 Mathematics and statistics 1.1 Apply numeric reasoning in solving problems – 4 credits; Internal
  • AS91030 Mathematics and statistics 1.5 Apply measurement in solving problems – 3 credits; Internal
  • AS91035 Mathematics and statistics 1.10 Investigate a given multivariate data set using the statistical enquiry cycle – 4 credits; Internal
  • AS91036 Mathematics and statistics 1.11 Investigate bivariate numerical data using the statistical enquiry cycle – 3 credits; Internal
  • AS91037 Mathematics and statistics 1.12 Demonstrate understanding of chance and data – 4 credits; External
  • AS91038 Mathematics and statistics 1.13 Investigate a situation involving elements of chance – 3 credits; Internal

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Last updated April 28, 2016



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