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New Zealand Sign Language L7: Context elaborations

Students are expected to begin to engage in sustained interactions and produce increasingly extended texts, in which they explore the views of others, develop and share personal perspectives, and justify, support, or challenge ideas and opinions in different situations. Students are expected to begin responding critically to more extended and varied text types on familiar matters.

Context elaborations are examples for teacher guidance only. They should not be used as assessment tools.

Example 1: NZSL an official language

NZSL an official language film

Context and text type

Hemi is a year 12 student who is Deaf. He gives a speech at his local marae, about New Zealand Sign language becoming an official language, and the exciting opportunities ahead.

Text type

Speech, formal. Productive.

Examples showing how the student is:

Communicating information, ideas, and opinions through increasingly extended and varied texts

Hemi uses a formal address to introduce his speech:

  • TENA KOTOU+++

He uses a mix of different structures to convey information and present views. For example, simple sentences:

  • NZSL, ME GROW-UP EVERYDAY USE NZSL

Hemi use more extended sentences with a combination of structures. For example:

  • GOOD CHALLENGE ALL (you-ALL) LEARN NZSL

This is a signed text, so Hemi’s NZSL features such as affirmation, pronouns and locatives (through pointing), facial expression and grammar, correct hand-shapes, appropriate signing space, body language, non-manual signals and different forms of questioning, have a bearing on the overall effectiveness of the communication and must be taken into consideration.

Hemi shows that he connects with his heritage, by using te Reo Māori, in his introduction and conclusion:

  • Whakawhetai ki a koe mo te matakitaki ai ki taku korero.

He shows that his understanding of the language has come from other sources:

  • FACT IX-me ALWAYS STILL LEARN POSS-my-own LANGUAGE LIKE NEW VOCABULARY

Beginning to explore the views of others

Hemi states the view of the audience when an important event is acknowledged:

  • ALL ENJOY PROUD, HAPPY WHEN OUR LANGUAGE RECOGNISE.

Hemi is also able to deliver a viewpoint that includes the input from others:

  • NZSL AWESOME OPPORTUNITY WHAT-for PEOPLE LEARN NZSL

Beginning to develop and share personal perspectives

Hemi shares his personal view with the audience:

  • ME HOPE ALL LEARN NZSL, DEAF KNOW HEARING KNOW (thru) LEARN

He uses evidence to develop his argument:

  • FUTURE NZ HIGH SCHOOL WILL HAVE+++ WHAT NCEA, WHAT-for, NZSL point Loc1

Beginning to justify own ideas and opinions

He states how others learning NZSL would benefit himself and others:

  • FANTASTIC PEOPLE CAN EXPRESS THROUGH NZSL SAME COMMUNICATE+++ WITH DEAF COMMUNICATE+++

He gives reasons to be proud of his language:

  • DEAF CULTURE ME mcs-IN, ME PROUD DEAF, ME INTERESTED+++ WHY mcs-PAH THIRD OFFICIAL LANGUAGE, NZ
  • Beginning to support or challenge the ideas and opinions of others

Hemi challenges hearing people to examine how they are communicating with Deaf people:

  • BEFORE, HEARING+++ COMMUNICATE++STUCK, GIVE-UP ME WHY, ENGLISH not-MY FIRST LANGUAGE

Beginning to engage in sustained interactions and produce extended texts

Hemi uses a range of tenses to develop his argument from different perspectives. For example:

  • NAME IX-me fs HEMI. SIGN NAME 1h HAIR-WAVE. NZSL IX POSS-my FIRST LANGUAGE
  • +++ WHY mcs-PAH 3RD OFFICIAL LANGUAGE IX-loc1 NZSL.

(future tense)

  • FUTURE, NZ HIGH SCHOOL WILL HAVE+++WHAT, NCEA CREDIT WHAT-for NZSL.
  • Nms-WOW, MEAN CREDIT CAN mcs-ACCUMULATE, me    future tense

A speech is an extended text. By delivering his speech, and accompanying it with appropriate NZSL features, body language and facial expression, Hemi sustains an interaction with his audience: they construct meaning from what he signs and, depending on their beliefs, are supported or challenged in their views.

Interpreting ways in which the target language is organised in different texts and for different purposes

Hemi uses devices typical of speech-making. For example, he uses rhetorical questions to stimulate a response in the minds of the audience and keep them involved in the ideas he is presenting:

  • ME INTEREST+++ , NZSL mcs-PAH 3RD OFFICIAL LANGUAGE

Hemi uses fillers to process information:

  • NZSL ACT SET-UP filler-(hmm)-2007 neg filler-(umm) 2006

Opportunities for developing intercultural communicative competence

Students could explore the differences between Deaf speech making and speeches made in hearing cultures that they are familiar with. What is the role of an interpreter? How is applause indicated?

Students could explore different ways of introducing and concluding a speech. For example: by using Te Reo Māori, the languages of the Pacific or a traditional proverb, such as “Deaf can do anything except hear”.

Students could look at the history of NZSL its development and obstacles that were overcome. They could compare the way NZSL changes as new signs are developed with changes in another language they are familiar with.

Last updated January 20, 2017



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