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NZSL L8: Example 2

Example 2: Pressures to be online (Interactive)

NZSL L8: Example 2 – Pressures to be online 

 

GLOSS

WHINA

                                                                                                          Y/NQ           

IX-you KNOW IX-that ARTICLE “ON-LINE COMMUNITYIY” WE-two READ FINISH. WE AGREE RESEARCH AND SHARE IX-them

LEI                       

NOD, TEENAGERS WORLD-IX +++ INTERESTING READ+++ DIFFERENT++ STORY ALL SAY SAME THING.

                                   NEG

IX-they MUST ON-LINE WANT MISS ANYTHING DISCONNECT FRIEND++.

WHINA

ONE GIRL IX-she FROM GERMANY REALISE IX-she ON-LINE 6 HOURS. IX-she SEE FRIEND WHAT-2h++ AND WATCH DIFFERENT++ VIDEO. FINE++ NOTHING WRONG. INTERNET LIKE poss-HER BEST FRIEND.

LEI

                                                             NEG

IX-me THINK IX-you FINISH READ IX ARTICLE. IX-me FINISH READ IX-she MUST ON-LINE MAKE-SURE POSS-her FRIEND NOT GOSSIP ABOUT POSS-her.

WHINA

TEENAGERS TEND WAY. EH BIG PROBLEM.

LEI

IX-you FINISH READ ABOUT POSS-her PAST. WHEN IX-she DISCONNECT INTERNET SHE FEEL ISOLATED, LOW-CONFIDENT. TERRIBLE-2h EXPERIENCE.

WHINA

                                 NEG

BUT ALL TEENAGER NAH++ ONE GIRL IX THAT-ALL-2h

LEI

NAH++ IX-me FINISH READ “BRITISH HEALTH EDUCATION SURVEY” IX SAY ON-LINE LONG-TIME MAKE SELF-CONFIDENCE-DOWN. NOT ONE GIRL HAVE+++

WHINA

TRUE++ LAST YEAR I READ TERRIBLE ABOUT YOUNG PEOPLE ON-LINE. IX-you SEE SURVEY AGE 11-17 ON-LINE BULLY++   (rh-q)-HOW-MANY, 35%.

LEI

NOD CENSUS-DATA SAY IX-location NZ 80% HOUSE HAVE INTERNET. IX-me GUESS WE NEED AWARE ABOUT YOUNG PEOPLE ONLINE LOT. RISK. HOW WE STOP IX-that BUT LOOK-AFTER OURSELVES PLUS FRIENDS.

WHINA

NOD, DOESNT-MATTER WHICH COUNTRY IX-you LIVE. EVERYONE ACCESS INTERNET ANYWAY.

Context and text type

This is a conversation between two year 13 student learners of NZSL: Whina and Lei. They are discussing their research into pressure on high school students to be online.

Text type

Conversation, informal. Interactive.

Examples showing how the student is:

Communicating information, ideas, and opinions through extended and varied texts

Whina links survey data and online articles with a personal reflection about herself and her friends:

  • … census data shows 80% of houses in NZ have internet.  I guess we all have to be aware of how connected young people are. There are risks being online. I’m not sure what can be done to stop it but look after ourselves and our friends.

Lei considered the similarities in the articles she read and summarised them:

  • Even though they were from different countries they all seemed to say the same thing. They needed to be online so that they didn’t miss out on anything from their friends.

Exploring the views of others

Lei used results from a survey to provide evidence that pressures to be online cause harm for teenagers:

  • No! I read a British Health Education Survey that showed when teenagers spend a lot of time online, their self-confidence goes down, so it’s not just one girl.

Developing and sharing personal perspectives

Lei develops her personal perspective that teenagers feel pressured to be online:

  • They needed to be online so that they didn’t miss out on anything from their friends.
  • No! I read a British Health Education Survey that showed when teenagers spend a lot of time online, their self-confidence goes down…

Justifying own ideas and opinions

Each student uses survey results to justify opinions:

  • Did you see the McAfee survey that said 35% of 11–17 year olds get bullied online?
  • Census data shows 80% of houses in NZ have internet.

Supporting or challenging the ideas and opinions of others

Lei repeatedly challenged Whina’s interpretation of the issues for teenagers:

  • Actually I don’t think you read all of that article! I read the girl felt she needed to be online to check on her friends and to make sure nobody was gossiping about her.  
  • Didn’t you read about her bad experiences in the past and she felt isolated and less confident when not online?

Whina responded to Lei by questioning Lei’s use of only one teenager:

  • But that is just how one girl felt, not all teenagers. You can’t generalise from one example.

Engaging in sustained interactions and producing extended texts

Both students show they are engaging in a sustained interaction by challenging each other’s ideas, listening to differing viewpoints and reaching a consensus. Through this extended interaction, Whina changes her view on the effect of pressures to be online:

  • Oh…Well… true… that matches articles I read last year explaining some terrible incidents involving young people as a result of being online.

Exploring how linguistic meaning is conveyed across languages

Whina indicates that she understands there are a number of different articles that match Lei’s opinion by repeating the sign "match".

Analysing how the use of the language expresses cultural meanings

Lei uses a hand-wave negation signal, combined with facial expression (negative) to create a softer negation because they are in a conversation, not an argument.

Opportunities for developing intercultural communicative competence

Students could explore how agreement and disagreement are expressed in different cultural situations.

Students could watch a variety of signed texts and identify the uses of yes and no. They could prepare and take part in a role play that explains the different uses of yes and no in NZSL and English.

Students could also compare and contrast the use of modals in spoken English and NZSL. As a result, they could share how their language and cultural knowledge have developed and led to improvements in their own signing.

Student could explore factors that influence confidence in teenagers in New Zealand and another country. Factors could include behaviour of friends, family relationships, involvement in sport and community groups, success at school and appearance. They could reflect on factors that influence their personal confidence.

Students could research and prepare a vlog giving advice about being safe online.

Last updated January 25, 2017



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