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NZSL L6: Example 3

Example 3: Poster for speech competition

Poster for speech competition film

Context and text type

The student signing promotes a Speech Competition, advertised in the poster. This clip is to be placed on the Deaf Centre website.

Text type

Informal. Receptive.

Observations a student might make concerning:

Information, ideas, and opinions communicated in the text

Student signing provides details for the event:

  • NOW, list IX finger , KELSTON BOYS’ HIGH SCHOOL IX- loc IX-loc
  • ,7.00 - 9.00, NIGHT

Student signing gives the categories for the speech competition, using the sign “group” in three locations. (loc left, left middle, loc right)

  • IX-loc left GROUP RESEARCH CAN SIGN OR ORAL, SPEECH
  • IX-loc middle GROUP TRUE LIFE STORY  SIGN OR SPOKEN ENGLISH
  • IX-loc right GROUP NZSL  SIGN IX

Student attempts to evoke a response in the audience using a formulaic expression, “come on” and an imperative.

  • COME-ON, MAKE YOUR PARENT PROUD

How the writer expresses personal ideas and opinions

Student signing expresses their own opinion on the value of the prize money by using multi- channel sign.

  • COME-ON, , $100.00  COME-ON

Student signing challenges others to participate using a rhetorical question and a superlative.

  • COMPETE+++, WHO BEST?

Student signing expresses a personal opinion about the event.

  • FANTASTIC ALWAYS, INTERESTING , YOU  ENJOY, SAME ME

How the language in the text is organised for the writer’s purpose

Rhetorical questions are used to get the target audience’s attention in a Deaf-appropriate way. Listing and rhetorical questions give structure and clarity to information delivery.

  • NOW, list IX finger , KELSTON BOYS’ HIGH SCHOOL IX- loc IX-loc
  • list 3rd finger , 24 SEPTEMBER
  • List 4th finger , NIGHT

Opportunities for developing intercultural communicative competence

Speech competitions are valued in Deaf culture. Students could use this signed poster as a stimulus for reflecting on and discussing the unique features of a Deaf speech competition and the challenges to be met by contestants and organisers. How could students support each other to enter?

Deaf culture has other unique activities that differ from hearing culture, for example Deaf Sport. Students could compare and contrast other Deaf activities with similar activities in hearing culture, identifying the positives for Deaf culture. How do activities such as Deaf sport enrich Deaf culture? Students could consider the specific needs of Deaf people in the sporting world, including investigating the differences between equipment and commands that Deaf and hearing use. What Deaf activities are students involved in already? What activities would they like to be involved in?

Students could prepare posters advertising another Deaf event, for example, KDEC Sports Day and prepare and sign a presentation promoting the event. They could consider the purpose, the target audience and the kinds of language used.

Students could compare two posters; one with strong visual elements and one with strong verbal elements, for example, metaphorical language. Discuss which is more Deaf friendly and why?

Last updated January 20, 2017



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