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AOs: L8

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NZSL L8: Example 3

Example 3: Migration (Productive)

NZSL L8: Example 3 – Migration

 

GLOSS

                                                             _______rhq

LONG AGO, NZ LOTS MIGRATION FROM WHERE, BRITAIN point-ref.  WHEN NZ 2006-2013, ASIAN MIGRATION INCREASE 33%

____________t                                                                   _______________________t

VIEW NZ PEOPLE, FEEL NEGATIVE+++ OVER MIGRATION.   ASIA NZ FOUNDATION SURVEY

SHOW, HALF NEW ZEALAND PEOPLE , POSITIVE OVER ASIAN MIGRATION

1/3RD NZ PEOPLE FEEL JOB TAKE AWAY +++++ GREYPOWER SAY OLDER PEOPLE FEEL NZ SOCIETY CHANGE+++ FAST!!!++

OPINION, FEEL BIAS STRONG.  NOT-all FACT RECEIVE YET.

SPOONLEY SAY MIGRANT THROUGH SKILL, HAVE ++++ GOOD, SETTLE HERE NZ GOOD

OTHER FACT, 1.  MAJORITY NEW ZEALAND EUROPEAN 69%, (SHIFT)

                         2.   MAORI 2nd MAJORITY 14.6%

                         3.    ASIAN 9.2%

                       4.  PACIFIC ISLAND 6.9 % 

 

GREYPOWER THREAT, FEEL THROUGH 9% ASIAN MIGRATION.

WE (all) NEED HONEST OVER HISTORY MIGRATION. WE-all MIGRANTS PAST.

NO-MATTER 1ST GENERATION, 5TH GENERATION MANY MIGRANTS+++ FOLLOW KIWI WAY THROUGH BEHAVIOUR, EATING, TALKING.

___________________t

STATS NZ INFORMATION   ANCESTORS +++++ (point upwards) PROUD ARRIVE NEW ZEALAND START FRESH.

______________t

NATIONAL VALUE+++ THROUGH SELF-RELIANCE, HARD WORK++, LOOK-AFTER OTHER PEOPLE.

OUR ANCESTOR EXPERIENCE PASS DOWN INFORMATION SHARING.   QUEUE+++ BLOCK. FAIR? 

Context and text type

A NZSL speech on the positive and negative effects of migration on NZ society, based on information from a newspaper article.

Text type

Speech, Formal. Productive.

Examples showing how the student is:

Communicating information, ideas, and opinions through extended and varied texts

The signer explains that most migrants used to come from Britain, with examples that accentuate how similar these migrants were to the majority of the population of New Zealanders at that time. By accentuating the similarities, the signer implies that the New Zealanders did not feel threatened by these migrants.

  • In the past, the highest number of migrants came from Britain. They looked like, behaved like, ate and sounded like the majority of Kiwis.

The signer uses repetition of the imperative "think" at the beginning of statements to support the view that migration is beneficial for this country. The use of the repeated command to think encourages the viewer to engage in the topic and alerts them to the fact that views from one side of the argument are being presented. Think about the other view.

  • Consider the facts

Exploring the views of others

The signer uses information from a survey to explore the view that some New Zealanders find it difficult to see migration as a positive thing for the country:

  • A survey by the Asia NZ Foundation found that only half of New Zealanders feel positive about Asian migration.
  • A third of respondents felt that their jobs were being taken away.

Developing and sharing personal perspectives

The idea that New Zealand’s national values are derived from migrant beliefs is developed. The signer uses a rhetorical question to share a personal perspective that we should allow other people to have the opportunity to live in NZ.  

  • Our national values of self-reliance, hard work and caring for others were built on the shared experience of our ancestors. Why should we slam the door on others?

Justifying own ideas and opinions

The signer uses a quote from an expert to justify a personal opinion that negative attitudes towards migration are based on prejudice.

  • …Massey’s Professor Spoonley points out there are advantages in encouraging skilled migrants to put down roots and contribute to NZ society.

Supporting or challenging the ideas and opinions of others

The signer challenges the negative view of migration expressed by Grey Power, by using data to show that Asians make up only a small percentage of migrants:

  • …the majority of New Zealand’s population is of European descent (69%), with the indigenous Maori being the largest minority (14.6%), followed by Asians (9.2%)…..

Second example

The signer uses an additive conjunction to support the argument that New Zealanders find it difficult to see migration as a positive thing for the country.

  • Furthermore (sign also), Grey Power claims that older citizens feel threatened by the speed of change to NZ society.

Engaging in sustained interactions and producing extended texts

The signer extends the interaction by linking a question in paragraph five back to a statement in paragraph two:

  • Question: Why is Grey power threatened by 9%?
  • Statement: Furthermore, Grey Power claims that older citizens are threatened by the speed of change to NZ society.

Exploring how linguistic meaning is conveyed across languages

A notional timeline is used to give information about when the sharp increase in Asian migration occurred.

  • From 2006–2013

The use of signing space also makes visually clear which side of the argument is being supported. “View” is signed by the left hand or right hand to indicate which side of the argument is being discussed.

Analysing how the use of the language expresses cultural meanings

The multi-channel sign "shift" is used when listing the ethnic groups in New Zealand society. These groups are signed, spatially, in descending order of size. 

  • …European (69%), Maori (14.6%), Asians (9.2%) Pacific Islanders (6.9%).

Opportunities for developing intercultural communicative competence 

Students could compare and contrast the techniques used by speakers and signers to keep an audience engaged in a speech. For example, the use of repetition in Martin Luther King’s “I have a Dream” speech.

Students could investigate the use of rhetorical questions in English and NZSL and sign examples to show causation, to involve the audience in a narrative or to draw attention to a topic or a piece of information.

Students could explore their own or classmates’ cultural heritages and their influence on New Zealand’s culture. 

Last updated January 25, 2017



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