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Home economics: Level 8 sample programmes

Level 8 has been selected for these sample courses to highlight the depth required for learning at this level and to support teachers in both the preparation and delivery.

When planning a level 8 home economics programme, teachers need to work with their students to identify the context for learning, in line with the five main focus areas that are the foundation of all home economics education at this level. These are:

  • well-being
  • the determinants of health
  • social justice
  • sustainability
  • health promotion.

The knowledge is shaped by the underlying concepts that lie across the big focus areas and contexts – in particular, the intent of NZC achievement objectives A3, A4, C1–3, and D1–D4. 

This selection of contexts may relate to different themes for learning introduced across the programme, or be self-contained units related to the standards. Teachers must consider any assessment specifications that will affect their choices for the current year.

Note: When selecting home economics standards to assess learning, use level 8 standards in conjunction with standards from other matrices. The conceptual learning required to carry out a critical analysis must be included in the learning programme. 

For subject endorsement students will need to complete and achieve at least one externally assessed standard.

Planning approaches

Approach 1 | 2 | 3

The three different planning approaches below all have conceptual links between the units so that the students study a programme and not a series of unrelated topics. This will assist in students to become adept at thinking in systems and it may provide them with opportunities to challenge the status quo. Students will be able to make connections between the various aspects of the current food system (for example, from plants to plate). This will put them in a better position to question what is current practice and advocate for change.

Approach 1: A unifying big-picture concept

A single big-picture concept runs through and connects several units of learning. For example, the units could include scenarios on the theme of social justice, based on a group or groups in New Zealand society and looking at how they are affected. This does not prevent other big ideas from being interwoven into the programme.

Units of learning that link to this concept could be:

  • Cook for life – is the lack of practical cooking-related skills limiting people’s lifespan?
    • Links to social justice, well-being, the socio-ecological perspective, attitudes and values.
  • Ready steady cook – taking action to improve well-being.
    • Links to health promotion and well-being.
  • Ethical eating – does it matter?
    • Links to well-being, attitudes, and values.
  • Telling it like it is – is food advertising giving us the real picture?
    • Links to attitudes and values, the socio-ecological perspective.

Possible assessment

The following achievement standards relate to this concept and could be use for assessment (for students to be eligible for course endorsement, one standard must be externally assessed).

  • AS91466 Home economics 3.1: Investigate a nutritional issue affecting the well-being of New Zealand society
  • AS91467 Home economics 3.2: Implement an action plan to address a nutritional issue affecting the well-being of New Zealand society
  • AS91468 Home economics 3.3: Analyse a food related ethical dilemma for New Zealand society
  • AS91471 Home economics 3.6: Analyse the influences of food advertising on well-being

The order in which the students work towards these standards can be altered to meet their needs.

Approach 2: Contexts connected by a theme

In this approach students could investigate in depth an issue from a range of perspectives (lenses), such as ethics, nutrition, the role of multinational food companies, and food advertising.

The central theme could be posed as a question, such as:

  • Big food: To what extent can the current food system really deliver good health for all?

Units of learning that link to this theme could be:

  • Meeting the needs. 
  • In a perfect world …
  • Who drives the food supply?
  • It must be true …

Possible assessment

The following achievement standards relate to this concept and could be use for assessment (for students to be eligible for course endorsement, one standard must be externally assessed).

  • AS91468 Home economics 3.3: Analyse a food related ethical dilemma for New Zealand society
  • AS91469 Home economics 3.4: Investigate the influence of multinational food corporations on eating patterns in New Zealand
  • AS91470 Home economics 3.5: Evaluate conflicting nutritional information relevant to well-being in New Zealand society
  • AS91471 Home economics 3.6: Analyse the influences of food advertising on well-being

Approach 3: Big ideas and interconnecting themes

In this planning approach the main ideas such as (health promotion, social justice, well-being, determinants of health, and sustainability) are interwoven into a programme with clear links between the units of learning.

Units of learning that link to this learning could be:

  • Nutrition in New Zealand
  • Fact or fiction?
  • The real deal on the modern food system
  • Fat tax

Possible assessment

The following achievement standards relate to this concept and could be use for assessment (for students to be eligible for course endorsement, one standard must be externally assessed). Some of these standards are still under consultation and the precise wording of their titles may change.

  • AS91466 Home economics 3.1: Investigate a nutritional issue affecting the well-being of New Zealand society
  • AS91468 Home economics 3.3: Analyse a food related ethical dilemma for New Zealand society
  • AS91469 Home economics 3.4: Investigate the influence of multinational food corporations on eating patterns in New Zealand.
  • AS91470 Home economics 3.5: Evaluate conflicting nutritional information relevant to well-being in New Zealand society

Last updated October 8, 2012



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