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Level 6 dance achievement objectives

The four arts strands work in combination. Together they provide the basis for a well-rounded programme. They weave through all aspects of learning in dance: choreography, performance, or perspectives.

Generally, the strands are not taught alone. When focusing on teaching achievement objectives from one strand, teachers will usually find they can cover objectives in another strand.

The strands are separated here as a way of helping teachers to unpack the language of the strands and the objectives at this level.

Indicators are examples of the behaviours and capabilities that a teacher might expect to observe in a student who is achieving at the appropriate level. Teachers may wish to add further examples of their own.

For any terminology used in the achievement objectives, or the indicators, check (and download) the Arts Online Dance Glossary.

Understanding dance in context (UC)

Achievement objective

Students will:

  • explore, investigate, and describe the features and background of a variety of dance genres and styles.

Indicators

  • Physically explores and learns movements unique to a variety of dance styles, such as waiata-a-ringa, musical theatre, Charleston; through these practical learning experiences, describes the key movements associated with these styles.
  • Talks, presents, or writes about historic features of styles, such as the social and/or cultural value of the style or the historic timeline of its development.
  • Names key features that make a style what it is. Describes, for example, costumes typical of a performance in that style; the musical accompaniment/sound used; the style’s popularity; its movement vocabulary; notable dancers or performance groups in the style; how these style features have become codified or known in the way they are today.

Developing practical knowledge in dance (PK)

Achievement objective

Students will:

  • develop and demonstrate skills in selected dance genres and styles and explore the use of a variety of technologies.

Indicators

  • Executes a range of steps/movements used in selected dance genres and styles, for example, in hip hop – popping, locking, isolation, or, in ballet – plie, releve, fouette, pirouette.
  • Performs dance motifs and sequences that connect several individual steps together, in a variety of genres and/or styles, for example, a longer hip hop or ballet sequence (as mentioned above).
  • Uses digital technology to create sounds and accompaniments to dance to reflect the mood or feel of a series of movements in a selected dance genre or style.

Developing ideas in dance (DI)

Achievement objective

Students will:

  • select and use choreographic devices, structures, processes, and technologies to develop and give form to dance ideas.

Indicators

  • In individual, pair, and group situations, composes dance sequences to given briefs and across a range of tasks.
  • Uses dance elements, structures, and technologies to show ideas.
  • Demonstrates choreographic devices as tools to generate movement.
  • Demonstrates a range of processes to create movement – images, poetry, social issues, and so on.
  • Uses the elements of space, time, relationships, body, and energy to bring ideas to life in dance.
  • Builds sequences using structures such as binary (AB), ternary (ABA), rondo (ABACADA …), narrative (storytelling), or natural cycles (phases of time, for example, seasons).

Communicating and interpreting in dance (CI)

Achievement objective

Students will:

  • prepare, rehearse, and perform a range of dances and demonstrate an understanding of the performance requirements of the genres and contexts.

Indicators

  • Breaks down dance sequences into smaller phrases and repeats these to refine and improve physical execution of the steps.
  • Presents several dance sequences that differentiate stylistic techniques and expression typical of different genre.

Achievement objective

Students will:

  • describe, explain, and respond to the ways that dance uses elements, devices, structures, performance skills, and production technologies to communicate images, themes, feelings, and moods.

Indicators

  • Watches or views a variety of dance performances on DVD, video, online, or live and through discussion and reflective writing, makes links between the movements seen and the possible ideas and messages (communication of intentions) in the dance.
  • Suggests or recalls (verbally and/or in writing) the ways in which space, time, energy, body, or relationship aspects are used or altered throughout a performance.
  • Discusses and forms reasons and responses about the costumes, sounds/accompaniments, props, or sets and lighting used in a performance.

Context elaborations

Context elaborations are possible contexts for learning, with a suggestion of how they might be used with the focus achievement objective.

The listed context elaborations are examples only. Teachers can select and use entirely different contexts in response to local situation, community relevance, and students’ interests and needs.

Learn more:

Assessment for qualifications

At the time of publication, achievement standards were in development to align them with The New Zealand Curriculum. Please ensure that you are using the correct version of the standards by going to the NZQA website.

The NZQA subject-specific resources pages are very helpful. From there, you can find all the achievement standards and links to assessment resources, both internal and external.

Learn more:

Aligned level 1 achievement standards were registered for use in 2011 and level 2 for use in 2012; level 3 will be registered for use in 2013.

Full information on the draft standards and the alignment process can be found on TKI: Alignment of NCEA standards with The New Zealand Curriculum.

It is important to remember that not all learning in dance needs to be assessed. There is value in dance creation and the exploration of genre and style that may not be assessed but could be a valuable step towards more complex work in the following year of study.

Last updated July 9, 2012



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