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AOs/LOs by level

Technological practice (TP)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3

Technological knowledge (TK)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3

Nature of technology (NT)

6-1 | 6-2

7-1 | 7-2

8-1 | 8-2

Design in technology (DET)

6-1 | 6-2

7-1 | 7-2

8-1/2

Manufacturing (MFG)

6-1 | 6-2

7-1 | 7-2

8-1/2

Technical areas (TCA)

8-1 

Construction and mechanical technologies (CMT)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3 | 6-4

6-5 | 6-6 | 6-7

7-1 |  7-2 |  7-3 |  7-4

7-5 |  7-6 |  7-7

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3 | 8-4

8-5 | 8-6 | 8-7

Design and visual communication (DVC)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3

Digital technologies (DTG)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3 | 6-4

6-5 | 6-6 | 6-7 | 6-8

6-9 | 6-10 | 6-11 | 6-12

7-1 |  7-2 |  7-3 |  7-4

7-5 |  7-6 |  7-7 |  7-8

7-9 |  7-10 |  7-11 |  7-12

8-1 | 8-2 | 8-3 | 8-4

8-5 |  8-6/7 | 8-8 | 8-9

8-10 |  8-11 | 8-12

Processing technologies (PRT)

6-1 | 6-2 | 6-3

7-1 | 7-2 | 7-3

8-1/2 | 8-3


Key messages for DVC achievement standard - AS91628

AS 91628 (3.31)Develop a visual presentation that exhibits a design outcome to an audience

Key messages for teachers

At level 8, students develop:

  • a visual presentation of a design outcome to a specified audience 
  • an exhibition/or exhibit that integrates exhibition design knowledge with the nature of the design outcome, the needs of the audience, and the constraints of the exhibition space.

Indicators

Students can:

  • Research into existing exhibition spaces, themes etc. Investigate the presentation techniques used, how the designer promotes the intent of the design in a convincing manner.
  • Decide upon the nature (theme) of the design outcome(s) being exhibited.
  • Identify who the audience is, what their needs are in terms of movement and viewing, and where the exhibition/presentation will be held.
  • Identify, decide, and use a suitable venue (exhibition space) that relates well to the chosen theme. This could be in a board room, living room, school hall, library etc.
  • Consider the aim of the exhibition/presentation. Students are able to articulate what they are trying to promote.
  • Plan and present an exhibition/presentation that does not need their physical presence there. Think of planning as considering: lighting, floor space, and height of display. Also how the viewer will interact with the room, the physical space. Hanging: display at a suitable height, for example, 60 inches from floor to centre of work. Transport of work, space for discussion etc.
  • Show evidence on the clarity of their decision-making, techniques used and the effectiveness of the exhibition.
  • They could ask pertinent questions in order to gain feedback/evaluations (even a visitors book) to gain evidence for the effectiveness of the exhibition and presentation of the work. Or observe interactions with the work being presented and the viewers.
  • Document any other evidence like use of music to set the atmosphere, promotional information, and descriptions added to the work
  • Develop the presentation of the outcome. (This does not mean present the whole design process.)
  • Select the design intent, either 2D or 3D, which they consider are important. Investigate the modes of presentation: sketches, instrumental drawings, models, photographs, digital media, display boards, installations, booklets etc.
  • Document the type of materials that have been considered for the presentation and how it relates to the exhibition space.
  • Demonstrate skills in the integration of techniques and formats to promote the design intent.
  • Communicate clearly the use of compositional design principles and how they have been used.
  • Has evidence of design decisions that show their knowledge of exhibition design and the nature of the design outcome are integrated.
  • Create a presentation to exhibit that is presented accurately, clearly and precisely that integrates audience considerations, exhibition design knowledge, and professional presentation techniques.

Teacher guidance

To support students to develop the skills and knowledge at level 8, teachers could:

  • Provide students with a brief that specifies all the assessment criteria. As a teacher you could define the exhibition space, the audience, and the design outcome or allow students to make their own decisions about what to present.
  • Give students' multiple opportunities to explore visual communication techniques for composing presentations/exhibitions.
  • Visit a local exhibition, invite a curator to talk to students about exhibition design, search the Internet for exhibitions and virtual exhibitions, talk via Skype to an exhibition designer to broaden students' understanding of the skills and techniques employed to develop a successful exhibition and meet the needs of the viewer.
  • Develop a questionnaire to guide students looking. Use questions that prompt students to look at aspects like lighting, the space, the use of design principles in the layout, how people are encouraged to move around the exhibition, height of display, presentation techniques used to engage the viewer, handouts, use and placement of written material, how the exhibition has communicated to them the viewer and so forth. What was the intent of the designer?
  • Provide the opportunity for students to discuss collaboratively to identify a variety of exhibitions/presentations that can be viewed online or through magazines.
  • Allow students to work in teams where each student takes responsibility and can use their own initiative and still keep other students' interests at heart.
  • Allow for a budget for the exhibition.
  • Help students to find a location/space for the exhibition. Think about renting a space, using a school space, library, restaurant or a café that is local. Or discuss fully the constraints of exhibiting work at a client’s venue/home.
  • Help students to set a date for the exhibition and advertise the event.
  • Teach students how compositional principles have been used to develop exhibition layouts. Look at: alignment, hierarchy, proximity, repetition, contrast, positive/negative space, and focal point.
  • Allow students to develop skills in different modes (digital applications, photography, models a variety of conventional drawing and sketching methods) so they can make informed choices when exhibiting their work.
  • Resource the department with a wide variety of presentation media (digital and conventional) for students to explore, test and make informed decisions when presenting/exhibiting their own designs.
  • Ensure all work is photographed clearly and stored for moderation.

Key messages from the standard

  • Explanatory note 4 explains what exhibition design knowledge is: “understanding the relationship between the viewer, the outcome to be exhibited, and the exhibition space, as well as understanding of compositional media and modes, and presentation techniques and formats.”
  • Explanatory note 5 is about presentation techniques:
    • “Presentation techniques refer to the use and understanding of compositional principles, modes and media for the purpose of the presentation."
    • “Compositional principles may include: proximity, alignment, hierarchy and the use of positive and negative space.”
    • “Modes may include: digital applications, other technological applications, photography, models, and the range of conventional drawing and sketching.”

Key messages from the clarifications document

TKI teacher guidance:

  • Considers the prior learning and what could be included in a brief.

TKI student instructions:

  • Investigates the type of research students could undertake through focus questions, recording initial ideas, developing ideas and recording decisions.
  • Technology assessment resources

Curriculum links

Resources

Last updated May 23, 2018



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